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Registered: 04-2003
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posticon More Halflings???


I have put together the following rules for two new Halfling Warriors, The Fieldwarden and the Halfling Chef. The Fieldwarden is based on the WFRP character of the same name. The Chef is based on other ideas I've seen.
Let me know what, if anything, you think. I would like to see them used in an all-halfling party.

Note that these are the Basic characters only. Future rules (basically only training, possibly more stuff for the Chef) will follow if needed.

Last edited by thecustodian, 23/Jun/2006, 3:39 am
23/Jun/2006, 3:38 am Link to this post Send Email to thecustodian   Send PM to thecustodian
 
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Re: More Halflings???


Halfling Fieldwarden
The Moot is the area of the Empire set aside for the Halfling people, and over the years they have planted its abundant fields and constructed towns and villages. The Moot, though, is not as secure as it might appear. Nearby is the cursed county of Sylvania, and many times in centuries past the Empire has had to fend off the living dead. Yet the Moot does not rely solely on human soldiers to protect them. The Fieldwardens patrol the outskirts, looking for potential threats. In times of attack, the Fieldwardens will band together to defend the Moot, often utilising their slingshots with deadly accuracy in mass volleys of stones. They make excellent guerrilla fighters, utilising their smaller stature to great effect.
An individual Fieldwarden is sometimes given a specific duty that takes him away from his patrol route, and conceivably this might lead to him joining a band of Warriors. Though not strong enough to physically grapple with many of the evils of the Old World, a Fieldwarden has a stout heart and is capable of great acts of bravery. They are also very handy with their slings and possess many of the skills of the infamous Halfling thief, although they can generally be considered more trustworthy. Of course, this is not always the case. Who can state with complete certainty that a Fieldwarden was sent on a mission because of his skills, rather than to rid the Moot of an embarrassment?


Wounds 1D6+6
Move 4
Weapon Skill 3
Ballistic Skill 3+
Strength 2
Toughness 3
Initiative 4
Attacks 1
Pinning Roll 3+

EQUIPMENT
A Fieldwarden carries a lunchbox in which he keeps several days’ worth of meals. Once per turn he may delve around in his Lunch Box for a suitable snack. Roll 1D6 at any time during the turn. On a roll of 4, 5 or 6 he finds something tasty and heals 1 Wound. The Lunch Box is rather large so there is no limit to the number of times he can do this. He can do this even when he is on zero Wounds.

WEAPONS
Fieldwardens carry several weapons to aid them against whatever troubles might arise as they patrol their beat.
They carry a Short Sword which does 1D6+2 damage in combat.
They also bear a sling, a weapon favoured by many Halflings. Fieldwardens practice with it constantly, and have done so since childhood. Because of this, they may choose either to use it twice in one turn, in which case it has Strength 2, or to use it once, in which case it has Strength 4. Taking longer allows the Fieldwarden to gain more momentum, and to target it more carefully at potential weak spots on his enemy.

SKILL – Scout
Fieldwardens are skilled at moving silently and swiftly, abilities that can be at a premium in a dungeon. They also have, as a requirement of the job, excellent hearing and sight. A Fieldwarden may use this to Explore, just as if he had the Lantern. The Fieldwarden only has to be within 2 board sections of the Lantern to avoid being lost in the dark, rather than 1 board section.
Furthermore, every time the Halfling's exploration shows a Dungeon Room, roll a dice. On a roll of a 6 turn over the next Event card to see what is in the room. You do not have to resolve the Event until you enter the room. Place the card on the board as a reminder.

SKILL – Duck
Halflings are not known for being able to take mighty blows and remain standing. It’s just not in their nature. It’s no surprise, then, that Halflings used to combat have learnt that the best way of dealing with blows is not to be there when they fall. A Fieldwarden may attempt to Duck any blow that hits, by rolling a 6 on 1D6. If he succeeds he takes no damage.

FIELDWARDENS & TREASURE
Fieldwardens do not, on the whole, wear armour. They are skirmishers, and so rely on speed and agility rather than the ability to take heavy blows. However, he may wear robes, furs and cloaks on the understanding that they might trail a bit on the floor if not tailored to his size. Fieldwardens might also carry a shield, but nothing heavier. At most their toughness can be increased by a maximum of +2 points by items of this nature.
Apart from the above exceptions, the Fieldwarden has the same item restrictions as the Halfling Thief.

Halflings and Food
A Halfling will never give food to anybody unless he considers he has enough left for an adequate meal. Whenever you want to heal another Warrior with provisions from your store you must first roll ID6. If the total is under the number of provisions you have left you may heal the other Warrior as normal. If the result is equal to or more than the number of Provisions you have left the Halfling hides his food and claims he has only a 'few crumbs' left.
Once the Halfling has decided he is down to the minimum he may not give up any provisions for the rest of the adventure.
A Halfling may always eat; it is an instinctive reaction that sets his hand reaching into his bag to grab some food. This means a Halfling may attempt to heal himself with any kind of food, even if he is at zero Wounds. He must still roll a 4+ to be successful in his attempt, just as if another Warrior was trying to heal him.
23/Jun/2006, 3:38 am Link to this post Send Email to thecustodian   Send PM to thecustodian
 
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Re: More Halflings???


Halfling Chef

If there is one thing that the Halflings are known for, it is cooking. The Moot abounds with restaurants and in most cities in the Old World there will be several Halfling establishments, often located near each other so that they can co-operate if one Chef runs out of one ingredient or if another is short-staffed and needs a dishwasher. Halflings returning from a hard day’s work (or whatever they like to call it) are guaranteed to find entertainment in this bustling corner of the city, and usually members of other races are welcome.
What with the Moot having a less-than-impressive military reputation (entirely undeserved, as many Halflings will expound), culinary achievement is usually the main contribution a Halfling makes to the great wars and fierce battles which rage across the continent at times. It goes without saying that the contributions of the (successful) Halfling spies and assassins are unrecorded.
This does not mean that all Halflings are devoted only to subterfuge and seasoning. Some take up arms and attempt to make their way in the wider world outside the Moot and the cities, having learnt how their skills will assist Warriors. Occasionally, for one reason or another, a Halfling Chef will leave his hearth and home, polish off the bow hanging above the door, and head out looking for adventure. A strange sight with his small form covered in pots and pans, he is a welcome sight to badly-fed Warriors everywhere.

Wounds 2D6
Move 4
Weapon Skill 2
Ballistic Skill 4+
Strength 2
Toughness 2 (3)
Initiative 3
Attacks 1
Pinning Roll 4+


EQUIPMENT
The Chef never leaves a settlement without stocks of food, primarily, expecting to have to feed hungry mouths every evening, regardless of whether or not he’s in company at the time.
At the beginning of each adventure he will have 2D6 Provisions. These will expire at the end of the dungeon as normal, but he will always have 2D6 more at the beginning of the next, in addition to any he buys.
A Chef also follows the tradition of roving Halflings and carries a lunchbox. Once per turn he may delve around in his Lunch Box for a suitable snack. Roll 1D6 at any time during the turn. On a roll of 4, 5 or 6 he finds something tasty and heals 1 Wound. The Lunch Box is rather large so there is no limit to the number of times he can do this. He can do this even when he is on zero Wounds.

WEAPONS
Halfling Chefs carry a Short Bow to help them deal with any trouble that might arise, as well as to bag a few rabbits for the pot if the occasion arises. It causes 1D6+1 damage.
For hand-to-hand combat, a Chef will use the first utensil or bit of cooking apparatus that comes to hand. This might be a rolling pin, saucepan, vegetable knife or full-blown cleaver. Whatever they use does 1D6+2 damage on a successful hit.

ARMOUR
No Halfling Chef will willingly leave his kitchen for any extended period without making sure his pots and pans are safe, and the best way to do that is to carry them. Without an apprentice or mule, a Chef will tie his pots, utensils and containers of ingredients onto strings and festoon his small body with them, sometimes to the extent of making him appear like a walking heap of iron. As well as their normal cooking dishes, most Halfling Chefs have a great respect for their cooking pot, and the apprentice who inherits the crock of the master will usually take over running the kitchen. Perhaps this is why roving Chefs, tend to wear it as a makeshift helmet. As well as this, the quantities of ironwork hanging from their pack in utensils, saucepans and secondary pots make a physical blow less likely to hit Halfling flesh (although it might dent an antique pan, which is in some ways worse!)
The pots and pans, especially the one worn as a helmet, give the Chef +1 Toughness.

SKILL – Field Kitchen
It goes without saying that a Chef is good at cooking, and is sometimes able to craft meals out of the oddest things. As they travel through the Old World they are constantly collecting ingredients from whatever fields, pastures and occasionally pantries they pass through, with little regard for ownership. This is partly an unconscious action, which makes it hard to keep track of what ingredients a Chef carries at any one time, as he also discards any that go rotten as he travels. Generally he will have a rough idea but on occasion a Chef has had to make do with nothing more than a sackful of onions after he’s promised to cook a meal.
At any point, the Chef may choose to prepare something to eat. He will whip out a pot and start adding ingredients, building a fire if appropriate and whistling a merry tune. Whenever there are no monsters on the board, the Chef may forego movement to cook. He will do this for the whole turn. If he wishes, he may serve up the meal then. His companions declare whether they wish to partake or not and he rolls 1D6 and adds the Power Dice, looking up the result on the table below. The Power Phase determines the random quantity of ingredients. There is nothing magical about this process (despite what some Chefs might hint!), but the Power Dice represents the vague idea of how much food the individual Chef is carrying.
If he is not ready, he may continue cooking. If he does so, the entire of the next turn is taken up with food preparation, and again at the end of the turn he must decide if the meal if ready. If it is, those who are going to eat must declare so. He then rolls 2D6 and adds the Power Dice of the first turn, but not the second.
He may continue to take more time for as long as he likes. For each additional turn he may roll 1 more dice, but only ever add the Power Dice from the first phase. In addition, the longer he spends, the more time that something goes wrong. If ANY of the dice he rolls comes up as a 1, the entire meal counts as Food Poisoning.
Field Kitchen Table
Result (1D6 + Power Dice) Meal Cooked
Natural Roll of 1 Food Poisoning! – Each partaker loses 1 wound unmodified.
2-3 Sparse fare – Each partaker recovers 1 wound if they roll 4-6 on 1D6
4 A modest offering – anyone eating regains 1 wound
5-6 A sound meal – anyone eating regains 1D3 wounds
7 Well-seasoned – anyone eating regains 1D6 wounds
8-9 A fine feast – those eating recover 1D3+3 wounds
10-11 A culinary triumph – partakers regain 1D6+5 wounds each
12+ A meal fit for a king – anyone eating is restored to full wounds

If the Chef is interrupted by a Monster Attack while he cooks, the meal is wasted as the Warriors scramble to defend themselves.
If the Chef or another Warrior wishes, they may improve the stock of ingredients by yielding up Provisions. Each Provision adds +1 to the eventual result. In the event of Food Poisoning or of a Monster Attack, these Provisions are wasted.
Note also that although Warriors have the opportunity to refuse to join in the meal (for example if they are on full Wounds or do not want to risk Food Poisoning), other Halflings must roll a 4+ on 1D6 to refuse; otherwise their stomachs decide it’s time to eat.

If the Chef so wishes, he may charge a fee of 5 gold per wound healed by his food. Warriors who contribute ingredients in the form of Provisions need not pay this. IF the Chef does NOT charge, then he gains +5 exp per wound healed. Most Halfling Chefs do not charge unless they are cooking for a special occasion or to paying customers. If they are preparing food for friends and allies it is considered that the reward the Chef receives is the enjoyment of the cooking process and of a meal with friends.

Finally, if there should be two (or more!) Chefs working together, they may not contribute to each other’s cooking. ‘Two Many Cooks Spoil the Broth’ as the ancient adage goes, and Halfling Labour Laws as well as natural pride mean that while Chefs might compete, or serve a more advanced Master, they seldom cooperate.

HALFLING CHEFS & TREASURE
The Chef has the same item restrictions as the Halfling Thief.

Halflings and Food
A Halfling will never give food to anybody unless he considers he has enough left for an adequate meal. Whenever you want to heal another Warrior with provisions from your store you must first roll ID6. If the total is under the number of provisions you have left you may heal the other Warrior as normal. If the result is equal to or more than the number of Provisions you have left the Halfling hides his food and claims he has only a 'few crumbs' left.
Once the Halfling has decided he is down to the minimum he may not give up any provisions for the rest of the adventure.
A Halfling may always eat; it is an instinctive reaction that sets his hand reaching into his bag to grab some food. This means a Halfling may attempt to heal himself with any kind of food, even if he is at zero Wounds. He must still roll a 4+ to be successful in his attempt, just as if another Warrior was trying to heal him.
23/Jun/2006, 3:40 am Link to this post Send Email to thecustodian   Send PM to thecustodian
 
OldWarrior Profile
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Re: More Halflings???


These are really great. I really like nearly everything about them.

Wonderful work, Thecustodian! Two thumbs up! emoticon

Hey, I just might do a halfling adventure myself now.

Last edited by OldWarrior, 23/Jun/2006, 6:20 am


---
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23/Jun/2006, 6:18 am Link to this post Send Email to OldWarrior   Send PM to OldWarrior Blog
 
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Re: More Halflings???


Interesting is the concept here that the chef could decide that, since his lot of ingredients (the power dice roll) is of rather poor quality -- or quantity, he may then take longer to prepare the meal, thus increasing the chance of a much better meal while also increasing the chance that something goes wrong in the meal.

I also like the fact that provisions may be used to help.

This character seems to me to be a great alternative/secondary "healer" for a party of warriors. AND, this is accomplished without him actually having to wear the title of "healer". He is just a common cook, albeit a rather small one. emoticon

I would assume by the above rules that the chef may decide to NOT partake of his own meal -- as long as he passes the 4+ test mentioned for halflings.

Assuming this is the case, it seems interesting to me that a chef could be on 1 wound (fairly common for halfings in my limited experience), starving to death, yet reluctantly try to prepare a meal for his fellows. Then he would try to resist partaking of said meal, because he noticed how meager were the available ingredients, only to turn his back on the party eating from the pot, so that he could search his lunch box for a snack to somewhat lessen the hunger pains.

(If there are any misconceptions on my part, please correct me.)

I find this quite entertaining! Let's have an adventure! If Thecustodian doesn't do one soon, I am afraid I will have to start one up. LOL

Last edited by OldWarrior, 25/Jun/2006, 6:54 am


---
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